EMC 2016

Scientific Programme

Materials Science (MS) sessions

MS0: Nanoparticles: from synthesis to applications (3 slots)

Interdisciplinary session, common between life and material science

Description of the session

Nanoparticles are currently at the roots of a variety of application domains, spanning from catalysis, nanoelectronics, energy harvesting and biotechnology to biomedicine or healthcare. In all cases, their functionality is tightly related to the ultimate structural and compositional details of their bulk and surface, as well as to their interactions with other particles or nanostructures in assemblies, composites or multicomponent-type materials. The broad range of microscopy techniques (electron and optical microscopies, correlative microscopy, in situ (gas, liquid...)) currently provide the means to reveal at the finest spatial scale, down to sub-angstrom, the 2D and 3D information required to monitor their synthesis and functionalization as well as to rationalize their behaviour. This interdisciplinary symposium aims at presenting the latest developments in the use of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques and methods to understand all these aspects related to nanoparticles, including toxicity and bio-safety issues.

Co-Chairs


José CALVINO 

Goran DRAZIC 

Christian RICOLLEAU 
Cadiz, ES Lubjina, SLO Paris, FR

Invited speakers

  • Thomas HANSEN (DTU Copenhague, DK)
  • Ziyou LI (Birmingham, UK)
  • Niels DE JONGE (INM Leibnitz, DE)

     

MS1: Structural materials, defects and phase transformations (3 slots)

Description of the session

Since the early studies of dislocations and precipitates in the 60’s, TEM stands as a major tool for investigating fine microstructural details and understanding the behaviour of structural materials. Indeed, TEM is a unique technique allowing for direct observations of defects involved in deformation mechanisms, of nano-precipitates responsible for strengthening, of chemical segregation at grain boundaries and interfaces as well as all types of phase transformations in alloys and composites. The recent advances in ultra-high resolution imaging and chemical mapping as well as innovative in situ mechanical testing, have increased the capabilities making possible to investigate the nowadays highly complex material like the advanced engineering materials or the nanostructured systems produced by extreme condition processing. This session will focus on the investigation of structural materials from conventional TEM imaging or diffraction to the most recent TEM or STEM imaging modes, involving spectroscopy, tomography techniques as well as in situ experiments. An important issue for this session will be to highlight the relevance and the impact of detailed microstructural studies for understanding of properties or on the design of new materials or materials processing.

Co-Chairs 


Patricia DONNADIEU 

Randi HOLMESTAD 

Simon RINGER 
Grenoble, FR Trondheim, NO Sidney, AU


Invited speakers

  • Hosni IDRISSI (EMAT Antwerpen, BE)
  • Stefan POGATSCHER (Leoben, AT)
  • Aaron KOBLER (KIT Karlsruhe, DE)
  • Laure BOURGEOIS (Monash U., Victoria, AU)

 


MS2: 1D and 2D materials (2 slots)

Description of the session

This session is devoted to studies of layered nano-materials of closed forms (fullerenes, nanotubes and –wires) and planar morphologies. TEM techniques (structural and analytical) have enabled major advances in the study of these materials, including information on the atomic scale by using aberration corrected TEM. This session will focus on achievements and challenges regarding state-of-the-art TEM studies of these materials combined with analytical (in-situ, EELS, EDX, CL) assessment, and also coupled with other characterization techniques, including Raman and infrared spectroscopy, and scanning probe microscopy (STM/STS, AFM). These techniques, especially in combination, are increasingly utilized to fully investigate nano-materials and provide deeper insights into their physical, optical and chemical properties, and hence are of high interest for this session.

Co-Chairs 


Ursel BANGERT 

Raul ARENAL 
Limerick, IRL Zaragossa, ES


Invited speakers

  • Ute KAISER (Ulm, DE)
  • Jeremy SLOAN (University of Warwick, UK)
  • Florian BANHART (IPCM Strasbourg, FR)

 


MS3: Semiconductors and devices (2 slots)

Description of the session

Material science investigation related to Semiconductors is now developing in many directions ranging from device industry to nanowires or nanoparticles grown by physical methods (MBE, MOCVD…) or chemical synthesis. In all these fields Electron Microscopy  (EM) is the technique of choice not only for imaging but for quantitative assessment on structural, electronic  and optical properties. Using simulations, advanced analyses and in-situ techniques EM is now able to produce a large amount of information.

This symposium invites contributions about microscopy methods and results as applied to the investigation of traditional semiconductors as well as new nanostructures and devices.

Co-Chairs 


Catherine BOUGEROL 

Vincenzo GRILLO 
Grenoble, FR Modena, IT


Invited speakers

  • Matthieu BUGNET (McMaster, Haminlton, CA)
  • Andreas ROSENAUER (Germany)
  • Takashi SEIKIGUCHI (Japan)

 


MS4: Complex materials and nanocomposites (2 slots)

Description of the session

This session aims to cover the correlated use of different light, electron, X-ray, ion and scanning probe microscopies and spectroscopies for the micro- and nanostructural study of complex materials systems which are challenging in terms of either their poor crystallinity, their tolerance to damage and their difficulty in sample preparation. Such complex systems may include, amongst other things, soft materials (polymers, liquid crystals, organic crystals), non-crystalline (amorphous, disordered systems and poorly crystalline systems, quasi-crystals), porous materials, organic-inorganic hybrids, biomaterials and polymer nanocomposites.

Co-Chairs 


Marc SCHMUTZ 

Rick BRYDSON  
Strasbourg, FR Leeds, UK

Invited speakers

  • Roger WEPF (ETH Zürich, CH)
  • Nico SOMMERDIJK (TU Eindhoven NL)
  • Layla MEHDI (PNNL, USA)

     

MS5: Energy-related materials (2 slots)

Description of the session

Future societies are highly dependent upon a consistent supply of energy. Sustainable development of technologies meeting these energy demands is one of the most important challenges for science and engineering. Additional aspects are environmental compatibility and the development of renewable energy sources and of technologies that are designed to improve energy efficiency.

This symposium will cover the aspects of structure and properties of materials for power generation, energy conversion, renewability, storage and reduced energy consumption, studied by using the methods of advanced microscopy and spectroscopy. Especially encouraged are also submissions that include multiple microscopy techniques (optic, electronic…) or special experimental conditions, such as  in situ (operando) and low/high temperature. Advanced techniques improving resolution (spatial, temporal or energy) applied to the sometimes delicate case of energy materials are also welcome. The topics include: Organic and inorganic materials for photovoltaic solar energy, Energy-storage materials, fuel cells, batteries, Materials for energy harvesting (thermoelectrics, piezoelectrics, pyroelectrics), Catalysis processes for novel clean technologies or environmentally friendly energy generation, Materials for conventional and nuclear plants, materials in extreme conditions, Novel materials for energy conversion and Correlation between synthesis, structure and properties.

Co-Chairs 


Philippe MOREAU 

Joachim MAYER 

Wolfgang JÄGER 
Nantes, FR Aachen, DE Kiel, DE

Invited speakers

  • Dierk RAABE (Max Plank, Dusseldorf, DE)
  • Ilke ARSLAN (PNNL, USA)
  • Erdmann SPIECKER (Univ. Erlangen, DE)
  • Yuichi IKUHARA (Univ. of Tokyo, JP)

MS6 : Oxide-based, Magnetic and other Functional materials and Applications (3 slots)

Description of the session

Functional materials such as complex oxides, metals or hybrid structures exhibit a great variety of properties, providing great potential for new physics and applications. The purpose of this session is to highlight the exciting developments being made in this field, including magnetic materials, superconductors, ferroelectric and multiferroic, topological insulators, and others, with special emphasis in low dimensional architectures such as heterostructures, thin films or nanostructures for which surfaces and interfaces are of major importance.

Keywords: Ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics (except when used for energy-driven applications, cf MS5); Superconductors (oxides, picnides); Magnetic materials and magnetic devices (permanent magnets, alloys and nano-alloys, soft/hard magnetic, diluted magnetic semiconductors, skyrmions; Multiferroics (intrinsic, extrinsic, stress-strain engineering); Surface and interfacial effects (2DEG, interface induced magnetic anisotropy, magnetoelasticity); Spintronics / oxytronics applications (GMR, TMR, Mott transition-based, electrical control, data storage), smart structures (sensors and actuators)..

Co-Chairs 


Etienne SNOECK 

Maria VARELA 
Toulouse, FR Madrid, ES 


Invited speakers

  • Quentin RAMASSE (SuperSTEM Daresbury, UK)
  • Toshiaki TANIGAKI (Hitachi, Saitama, JP)
  • Xiaoqing PAN (Univ. of CA, USA)
  • Maria D. ROSSELL (EMPA, CH)

 


MS7: Materials for optics and nano-optics (1 or 2 slots)

Description of the session

Nano Optics is experiencing a remarkable growth across the fields of physical sciences. Its aim is to study and understand the interaction of light with matter at the nanoscale to ultimately design, manipulate, and use nanoscale optical processes. This session is focused  on nanostructured materials supporting remarkable optical properties including photonic, plasmonic, opto-electronic and excitonic effects. The objective of this session is to represent the current trends in Materials for Nano Optics through high-quality theoretical, computational, and experimental contributions.

Related techniques are electronic techniques (including MEB and (S)TEM imaging, EELS, CL, tomography, PEEM, STM) and optical techniques (including NSOM, Spectroscopies, Time-resolved spectroscopies).

Co-Chairs 


David McCOMB 

Jérôme PLAIN 
Columbus, USA Troyes, FR

Invited speakers

  • Qihua XIONG (Nanyang University, Singapore) 
  • Jon CAMDEN (University of Notre Dame, USA) 
  • Luiz TIZEI (LPS Orsay, FR)

MS8: Geology and mineralogy, cultural heritage and archeology (1 slot ) 

Description of the session 

The use of microscopy plays a critical role in investigating materials with origins of geology and mineralogy, cultural heritage and archaeology. Characterisation and the associated interpretation of these materials present particular challenges owing to the localised variation in their chemical composition and microstructure, as well as maintaining sample integrity due to high electron beam sensitivity. However, recent improvements in several techniques including focused ion beam milling, electron backscatter diffraction, SEM, TEM and X-ray microanalysis have opened up new possibilities for the characterisation of natural materials at a significantly higher level of detail. This session focuses on the microscopic characterisation of materials ranging from natural and industrial minerals, planetary materials, cultural heritage and archaeology.

Co-Chairs 


Nicolas MENGUY 

Trevor ALMEIDA 
Paris, FR London, UK

Invited speakers

  • Marine COTTE (ESRF, FR)
  • Richard HARRISSON (University of Cambridge, UK)